The reason you're here is for the art.
the-lincolnshire-poacher:

It’s the most amazing story I’be ever read. Don’t be lazy, it’s well worth the read.

the-lincolnshire-poacher:

It’s the most amazing story I’be ever read. Don’t be lazy, it’s well worth the read.

Led Zeppelin - Black Dog
3,890 plays
imyourcocaine:

☁ sky is not the limit
endocrines:

this is very satisfying

endocrines:

this is very satisfying

daviddelruelle:

In the presence of all be nothing  (Artwork for a book project to come)

daviddelruelle:

In the presence of all be nothing  (Artwork for a book project to come)

darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ghosts in the Sun: Hitler’s Personal Photographers at Dachau, 1950

Do places have memories? Do buildings where people did terrible, bestial things to other human beings somehow retain an echo of that savagery within their walls, their floors, their foundations? Is it just our imagination that makes the skin crawl at places like Cambodia’s Genocide Museum, or Elimina Castle in Ghana, or any one of the Nazi’s extermination and slave-labor camps — or is it possible that there’s still something there, palpable and chilling, years later?

Even the most die-hard realist might find it hard to resist those sorts of questions when looking at Hugo Jaeger’s eerily quiet, color pictures from Dachau in 1950. Jaeger, after all, was not just another visitor to the former concentration camp; as Adolf Hitler’s personal photographer, he traveled with and chronicled Hitler and his Nazi cohorts at rallies, military parades, parties and, frequently, in quieter, private moments. The photos Jaeger made during his stint with Hitler were evidently so attuned to the Führer’s vision of what a Thousand Year Reich might look like that Hitler himself reportedly declared, upon seeing Jaeger’s early work: “The future belongs to color photography.




darksilenceinsuburbia:

Ghosts in the Sun: Hitler’s Personal Photographers at Dachau, 1950

Do places have memories? Do buildings where people did terrible, bestial things to other human beings somehow retain an echo of that savagery within their walls, their floors, their foundations? Is it just our imagination that makes the skin crawl at places like Cambodia’s Genocide Museum, or Elimina Castle in Ghana, or any one of the Nazi’s extermination and slave-labor camps — or is it possible that there’s still something there, palpable and chilling, years later?

Even the most die-hard realist might find it hard to resist those sorts of questions when looking at Hugo Jaeger’s eerily quiet, color pictures from Dachau in 1950. Jaeger, after all, was not just another visitor to the former concentration camp; as Adolf Hitler’s personal photographer, he traveled with and chronicled Hitler and his Nazi cohorts at rallies, military parades, parties and, frequently, in quieter, private moments. The photos Jaeger made during his stint with Hitler were evidently so attuned to the Führer’s vision of what a Thousand Year Reich might look like that Hitler himself reportedly declared, upon seeing Jaeger’s early work: “The future belongs to color photography.




jdx:

after the meltdown.  メルトダウン後。

/ roppongi. tokyo. japan.

jdx:

after the meltdown. メルトダウン後。

/ roppongi. tokyo. japan.

tessaladnow:

play it jimi

tessaladnow:

play it jimi